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Syndication

Welcome to the 46th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. Rafat is celebrating his birthday, we're not sure how old he is, but we know that he loves photography. So this week we are celebrating his birthday by doing a special show focused on photography in the digital age. Our roundtable includes crack professional photographer Gregor Halenda, photo and multimedia guru Brian Storm and social photographer extraordinaire Thomas Hawk in a wide-ranging discussion.

First is the debate over rights: Is it a good idea to post your photos on social media under a Creative Commons license? Or should you be more restrictive of your photos online? We also talk about the state of stock photography and the democratization of photography now that the tools are more accessible -- and everyone has a potential global reach online. And what about the rise of amazing cameraphones, apps and filters? Now that Instagram has been bought by Facebook for $1 billion, what's the implication about the future of photo-sharing and filters? Thomas Hawk also cites Google+ as being a hotbed of photography. How did it surpass Facebook?

Direct download: mediatwits46.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:43pm EDT

Welcome to the 45th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. That's right, Rafat Ali is back in the saddle after a nearly three month trek to India, Burma and Iceland. And he's back just in time to talk cord-cutting once again, this time after new research showed that cable lost 1 million subscribers last year. Special guest Seth Shapiro, an analyst and educator, tells us that the reality is that 1 million is a drop in the bucket for cable companies that have more than 100 million subscribers. Shapiro details why Netflix, Hulu, Google and Apple have a very long road ahead in trying to compete with cable and satellite services.

And now for something completely different. Google is offering up Customer Surveys that will allow people to answer a question or two in a simple survey instead of paying for content behind a pay wall. The marketer pays 10 cents to 50 cents per survey answered and the publisher gets 5 cents each, with Google pocketing the difference. Special guest David Cohn helped pioneer this survey model at Spot.us with its Community Focused Sponsorships. He explains what they learned about surveys at Spot.us and how Google might be doing an even better job with this idea, which could prove to be a worthy alternative business model for online publishers.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits45.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:38pm EDT

Welcome to the 44th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week, we convene a special roundtable to discuss how social media is changing activism, in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting, in a backlash to Rush Limbaugh, and in many other cases. Our special guests include BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti, Ohio State civil rights history professor Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Change.org's Brianna Cayo-Cotter. How do activist campaigns go viral, and can they go too far?

Then we talk about the recent legal drama around social network Pinterest, where some copyright holders have been upset with use of their images. The social network recently changed its Terms of Service so it no longer had the right to sell the images of people who posted on the site. Plus, it now allows self-promotion. Special guest Steve Eder of the Wall Street Journal talks about the various copyright debates Pinterest has spawned in the legal community.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits44.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:11pm EDT

Welcome to the 43rd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. She is back from SXSW and slowly recovering from the interactive, music and film festival. The big news this week is Pew's annual State of the News Media report, which painstakingly explains how people are consuming news (more and more on mobile) and where the digital ad revenues are going (mainly to tech companies and not traditional media companies). Special guest Amy Mitchell was one of the Pew researchers who worked on the report, and she explains that Twitter and Facebook were growing but still only referred 9% of traffic to news sites.

We also looked in-depth at Yahoo's recent patent lawsuit against Facebook, timed perfectly before Facebook's upcoming IPO. Special guest Edward Weisz is a longtime patent attorney, and Brad Plumer is a business reporter at the Washington Post. They explain how patent law works, the reasons for inventors taking out patents, and the difficulty that startups have in going up against established companies like Yahoo that have a 1,000+ patent hoard. Even former Yahoo developers are upset that Yahoo has decided to sue Facebook, and recently Facebook decided to buy 750 patents from IBM to help defend itself. Should patent law be reformed for software?

Direct download: mediatwits43.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:43pm EDT

Welcome to the 42nd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week is a special episode dedicated to all things South by Southwest (SXSW), the media confab covering technology, music and film down in Austin, Texas. We have a great lineup of guests, who all attended SXSW, including Reuters' Felix Salmon, Collaboration Central's Amanda Hirsch, Salon's Irin Carmon and The Verge's Laura June. Carmon wrote a piece about the increase in participation by women and people of color at the show, but how much further it still has to go to reach better diversity of voices.

Has SXSW peaked? Jumped the shark? One stunt that got a lot of attention was the "Homeless Hotspots," homeless people who carried hotspots with them and asked for donations in order to give people Internet access. Laura June wrote that this was the "best, worst, smartest, dumbest part of SXSW." Plus, there was a lot of hype around "ambient apps" such as Highlight and Sonar which tell you which of your friends are near you. And the big rumor of the show was that CNN might buy social media blog Mashable for $200 million, a story broken by Felix Salmon. It hasn't happened... yet.

Direct download: mediatwits42.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Welcome to the 41st episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the George Kelly as co-hosts. Kelly is online coordinator at the Contra Costa Times newspaper and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week we have an action-packed show with a lot to cover. First up is "The New iPad," announced by Apple on Wednesday with a higher resolution screen, 4G wireless and a better camera and software. Ho-hum or yowza? Special guests Leander Kahney from Cult of Mac and Tim Carmody from Wired talk about the iPad's logical new name, why it is leaps ahead of everything else -- but they still can't convince George to get one.

Next is a study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism, which surveyed newspaper executives to find out how they were transitioning to more of a digital business model. So far, it's been a tough slog, reports the PEJ's Mark Jurkowitz, who comes on the show to break down the report's findings. And last but not least is Nicholas Thompson, who was recently named the new editor at NewYorker.com. Thompson was co-founder of the Atavist and says there's been a renaissance in long-form content online, something that the New Yorker will fully take advantage of.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits41.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:09pm EDT

Welcome to the 40th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the George Kelly as co-hosts. Kelly is online coordinator at the Contra Costa Times newspaper and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week the big topic is pay walls, as both the Los Angeles Times and Gannett newspaper chains are planning to charge for access to their websites. Special guest Jimmy Orr is managing editor, online, for the L.A. Times, and joins us to talk about the new "membership program" the paper is rolling out on Monday. We also have special guest Ken Doctor, a newspaper analyst and author, who puts the pay walls into context with other pay plans that have already been in place. Can a regional paper like the L.A. Times succeed the same way that a more national paper like the N.Y. Times has done so far?

Also, there's been turmoil at AOL's TechCrunch tech blog, with editor Erick Schonfeld leaving and Eric Eldon becoming the new top dog. With so many defections from the site, and traffic off somewhere between 35% and 50% since Michael Arrington's departure, can Eldon bring back the magic? Or will the new publications such as Uncrunched and PandoDaily get more juice as TechCrunch stumbles?

Direct download: mediatwits40.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:33pm EDT

Welcome to the 39th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Brightcove's Eric Elia, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week we convene a special roundtable to talk about one of our favorite subjects: cutting the cord to cable TV! We had hoped that a Comcast executive would join us, but he had to cancel at the last minute. Fortunately, we still had a stellar lineup of guests: Wall Street Journal's Ben Schechter, NewTeeVee's Ryan Lawler and Free Press' Jenn Ettinger.

The big news of the week was that cable giant Comcast announced its own streaming service called Xfinity Streampix, which is only offered to cable subscribers. They either pay $4.99 per month for the add-on service or it's free for people in the higher tiers of service. Will it keep people from cutting the cord and dumping Comcast? Also, Google has been laying fiber optic lines in Kansas City for a test run of a possible pay TV service. What does the search giant have up its sleeve?

Direct download: mediatwits39.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:49pm EDT

Welcome to the 38th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. First, we get a special on-the-ground report from special guest Mohamed El Dahshan in Tunisia, talking about a ruling expected from the country's Supreme Court about filtering the Internet. Mohamed also talks about how freedom of speech online briefly flourished in Tunisia and Egypt before being reined in. We also talked about the case of Hamza Kashgari, who could get executed in Saudi Arabia because of three tweets he wrote directed to the prophet Mohammed.

Next up was a discussion about Pinterest, the visual social networking site that has become a hit among people who like to do scrapbooks and bookmarking online. Special guest Courtney Lowery Cowgill, who wrote a popular story about Pinterest, tries to explain what makes the site so addictive -- and whether they can figure out a business model for it. Finally, we discuss recent moves by Apple responding to investigative reports about appalling conditions at its factories in China. The tech giant hired a labor monitoring group to do inspections at its Chinese factories, but will Apple take action or is this just whitewashing the problem?

Direct download: mediatwits38.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:17pm EDT

Welcome to the 37th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. It's been a crazy week in media + tech, with important mergers abounding! First up is the Center for Investigative Reporting announcing that it will try to merge with another non-profit, the Bay Citizen, making a powerhouse investigative team to cover local, state and national issues. We get all the key players in that deal as guests on the show: CIR chairman Phil Bronstein, CIR executive director Robert Rosenthal and Bay Citizen interim CEO Brian Kelley.

Next up, there's a merger of key tech sites, both started by Indian-born bloggers who turned them into startup businesses. GigaOm announced it was buying PaidContent from the Guardian for an undisclosed sum. The Guardian will get stock in GigaOm's parent company and get a seat on the board. Special guests Om Malik, founder of GigaOm and Staci Kramer, SVP at ContentNext (and sometimes co-host of Mediatwits), talked about the deal and how the "synergy" in this case didn't mean layoffs. And finally, we discussed the recent move by Twitter to censor some tweets in countries that had more stringent free speech controls. Was Twitter right to implement these rules?

Direct download: mediatwits37.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:04pm EDT