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Syndication

Welcome to the 66th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. Sadly, this marks the last episode with Rafat Ali as co-host and our last episode of the year. In the new year, Mediatwits will be revamped as more of a weekly roundtable discussion moderated by Mark Glaser. But our last show was a fascinating one, an in-depth discussion on the state of the book publishing business, the future of print books and how e-books might evolve. Our guests were O'Reilly's Joe Wikert, Movable Type Management's Jason Allen Ashlock and BiblioCrunch CEO Miral Sattar. How can traditional book publishers and literary agents survive in a digital future, and will print books become endangered?

Direct download: mediatwits66.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59pm EDT

Welcome to the 65th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. The big news is News Corp. shutting the tablet-only publication The Daily, which was losing millions and not gaining enough traction. What did they learn from that experiment? Our show is largely about science, with a look at unmanned airspace vehicles (UAVs) or drones coming to journalism. What does the future portend for drones and will they invade privacy as well as domestic airspace? We spoke to Matt Waite from the Drone Journalism Lab as well as Katy Culver from the University of Wisconsin.

And then there's the wildly popular NASA.gov website, with photos, videos and interactive features for space buffs. The site is planning its first revamp since 2007, and is including the public in those plans by letting them come up with ideas and vote them up online. We spoke to NASA.gov manager Brian Dunlap, who's been running the site since 1995, for his insight.

Direct download: mediatwits65.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:23pm EDT

Welcome to the 64th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. We're back from the Turkey Day break and there's more news than ever: Jeff Zucker takes the reins at CNN; Marissa Mayer is leading a renaissance at Yahoo; and Facebook is shifting its privacy rules -- again. But the biggest story is the release of the Leveson Inquiry's massive report after nine months of testimony, considering new press regulation in the U.K. after the phone-hacking scandal. We talk to MediaShift correspondent Tristan Stewart-Robertson, who says that the Inquiry only wants regulation of mainstream press and is not considering blogging or the rising digital media in Britain.

Plus, we've been wowed by a new mashup called "The Beat":http://sm.rutgers.edu/thebeat/, taking photos from Instagram and placing them where they were taken with Google Earth images. It's striking to look at hashtags such as "#sandy":http://sm.rutgers.edu/thebeat/?q=sandy or "#drunk":http://sm.rutgers.edu/thebeat/?q=drunk. While it's a fascinating way to give context to Instragram photos, it also brings up privacy issues. Are people sharing too much on photo-sharing sites about their locations? We talk to Rutgers' Mor Naaman and Abe Stanway about their project.

Direct download: mediatwits64.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:16pm EDT

Welcome to the 63rd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil as co-hosts. Rafat Ali is off this week. Who's watching you online and what do they know about you? A lot of people are tracking you and they know a lot. Even the former head of the CIA now knows that emails don't exist in the ether. We talk about the ramifications of the Gen. Petraeus scandal, as well as living our lives online. Josh Stearns of the Free Press joins us to talk about his recent article for MediaShift calling on companies that collect our data to help fund a digital literacy campaign so we can educate people about online tracking.

Then we turn to the Ford Foundation, which made headlines this year with large grants to the Los Angeles Times and Washington Post to help them hire more reporters to boost coverage of important issues. It's the first time Ford's journalism division has funded for-profit media operations. Ford Foundation's Jonathan Barzilay and NYU's Jay Rosen join us to talk about the grants, and what Ford aims to get from them. Will more news orgs look to grants in the future?

Direct download: mediatwits63.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:31pm EDT

Welcome to the 62nd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week is a special edition of the podcast, with a focus on the coming election and the role of digital and social media leading up to it. But just as the political campaigns had to adjust to Hurricane Sandy, we also couldn't ignore the biggest story of the week. Rafat had to live in a hotel for a couple days and his workmates in New York are still without power. We spoke to WNYC's Caitlin Thompson and Washington Post's Cory Haik about how those sites covered Sandy in real-time, and the lessons they learned that will help them on Election Day.

We also went deep into politics, bringing on Pew Internet's Aaron Smith to give us some stats on social media use this election cycle, and Sunlight Labs' Tom Lee to tell us about their efforts at bringing transparency to the massive amounts of money being injected into the campaigns. How will that change the way we get news on Election Day? Will it be another dual-screen or multi-screen experience for political junkies?

Direct download: mediatwits62final.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:11pm EDT

Welcome to the 61st episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week is a very special edition of the podcast, with an in-depth interview with "minor TV personality" John Hodgman, a regular correspondent on "The Daily Show" and the "PC" in the Mac vs. PC ads from Apple. Hodgman talked about his new book "That Is All," where he continues to deconstruct the expert. He also talks about his love for Twitter (not for Facebook), as well as Apple products. Will he be first in line for the iPad Mini? No, but that doesn't mean he can't appreciate all the new improvements that Apple makes.

Speaking of the iPad Mini, our second segment is a discussion about the announcement of the 7.9-inch tablet and how it stacks up against the other smaller tablets such as the Kindle Fire HD and Google Nexus 7. If you were buying one as a Christmas gift, which one should you get? We asked our gadget experts Nicole Lee of Engadget and Matt Buchanan of BuzzFeed. They also discussed the new Microsoft Surface and whether it stands a chance in a world of Fandroids and iSheep.

Direct download: mediatwits61.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:43pm EDT

Welcome to the 60th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. We were recording the podcast when the big news came down that Newsweek had decided to end its print edition. Can a digital-only Newsweek survive with all the cut-throat competition online? This week also saw the launch of Circa, a new type of mobile news app that collects the "atomic parts" of stories -- facts, quotes and images -- and puts them into running stories with alerts to updates. We talked to Circa founding editor David Cohn as well as PandoDaily's Sarah Lacy about the prospects for Circa now and in the future.

After a recent story in the New York Times about BlackBerry users being seen as the "black sheep" of the smartphone world, we talked with a couple BlackBerry power users who still have faith in the struggling platform. The Atlantic's Zvika Krieger and CIO.com's Al Sacco both spoke up for BlackBerry users and said as content creators (and people who like the dedicated keyboard) there's still life in the BlackBerry in an age of iPhones and Androids.

Direct download: mediatwits60.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:50pm EDT

Welcome to the 59th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week is a special edition of the podcast completely focused on the challenges of online services such as YouTube, Facebook and others who have to balance free speech and hate speech while serving global audiences. The latest example being "The Innocence of Muslims" video that was posted on YouTube, and temporarily removed in Libya and Egypt by the service, later having them restored. Was it the right decision or too little, too late? Our guests include the World Policy Institute fellow Susan Benesch, EFF's Trevor Timm and legal scholar Jonathan Peters.

Direct download: mediatwits59.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:49pm EDT

Welcome to the 58th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week, we take a look at the changes in coverage of the presidential debate, with live-streaming online, instant fact-checks and added context, and even "live-GIF'ing." Tumblr's Christoper Price and the Sunlight Foundation's Bill Allison talk about the hits and misses during the debates and how @FiredBigBird went viral. Does it add more to the debate or is it all a big distraction?

Then we look deeper at the challenges for mobile advertising. For years, experts said mobile ads would rule, and now with so many more people getting news on mobile devices, the time has come. So why are they falling short? We talked to the IAB's Joe Laszlo, AdAge's Jason Del Rey and consultant Chetan Sharma to find out how advertisers and publishers can improve the mobile ad experience. Simply repurposing online ads on mobile isn't the answer, but what is?

Direct download: mediatwits58.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:27pm EDT

Welcome to the 57th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week, we take a deep dive into "responsive design," a new design philosophy that creates consistent-looking sites on the web, smartphones and tablets. It started with the Boston Globe and now is coming to the USA Today website and the new Quartz e-magazine from Atlantic Media. We talked to Fantasy Interactive's Stephen Carpi, who worked on USAToday.com's design, and Quartz senior editor Zach Seward about their designs, how users would react, and what it would mean for new types of ad formats.

In the wake of managers buyout out Village Voice Media, and splitting off the Backpage.com sites, we decided to think more about alternative weekly newspapers and how they can evolve and survive in the digital age. Media critic and professor Dan Kennedy, who has written extensively for the Boston Phoenix, joined our discussion along with Tiffany Shackelford of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. What mobile initiatives are working for alt-weeklies, and can big town publications survive in an overloaded ecosystem of media outlets?

Direct download: mediatwits57.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:39pm EDT

Welcome to the 56th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week we try to pierce the heavy-duty hype coming from Apple around its new iPhone 5, as well as the hype about social media marketing. First, we discuss the iPhone 5 and how it has only incrementally improved on the last generation of phones. Engadget's Nicole Lee and Buzzfeed's Matt Buchanan give their take, and discuss how it stacks up against offerings from Nokia and others. Is Apple only good at making breakthroughs with entirely new product lines?

Then we talk with author and comedian B.J. Mendelson, who read every book about social media marketing and tried and failed to break through following their tips and tricks. He finally decided that their hype around social media was complete bull, and wrote a book titled "Social Media Is Bull***t." While he uses Twitter quite a bit to test out jokes, he thinks it's a joke for every business under the sun to feel like they have to engage on every social platform or they will die. Mendelson shares his caustic take on the marketing business.

Direct download: mediatwits56.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:23pm EDT

Welcome to the 55th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week, we follow up our report from the RNC with three guests at the DNC in Charlotte: Adam Connor from Facebook; Adam Sharp from Twitter; and our MediaShift correspondent Ari Melber. This convention season has been a hit on social media, and we've seen so many numbers and graphics showing popular hashtags and memes. But what will it all mean in the end? Will it move the needle for the election?

Also, Amazon has had a banner week, announcing a new line of Kindles, including an illuminated Paperwhite and a larger Kindle Fire. And the company's nemesis Apple was disappointed by a settlement in an e-book price-fixing lawsuit between the states and three large publishers. Where does that leave the other two publishers and Apple, who are continuing their fight in court? Will it lead to cheaper e-book prices? We ask paidContent's Jeff Roberts, as well as MediaShift correspondent Barbara Hernandez.

Direct download: mediatwits55.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:57pm EDT

Welcome to the 54th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. The big news is that Apple won a $1 billion patent judgment against Samsung and is trying to block the sale of many Samsung smartphones. What does this mean for other competitors, Android and consumers?

We also had a couple special guests reporting live from Tampa at the GOP Convention, including James Davis, the director of communications for the convention, and Dr. Mark Drapeau, who works at Microsoft. They tell us about the success of the "digital green room" for speakers, and some interesting Foursquare partnerships -- and the lack of action on Pinterest. Plus, Ask.com CEO Doug Leeds and AllThingsD's Peter Kafka discuss the recent acquisition of About.com by IAC (which owns Ask.com) and their plans to integrate the site more closely with Ask.com. The New York Times had some success with About.com but then sold the site off to try to refocus the company. Can IAC do more?

Direct download: mediatwits54.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:01pm EDT

Welcome to the 53nd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. We were off on hiatus the past few months while Mark was getting a kidney transplant and Rafat was launching his new travel startup, "Skift":http://www.skift.com. 

This week we are looking at a couple big online video intiatives: the new "HuffPost Live":http://live.huffingtonpost.com video channel that will stream 12 hours per day 5 days per week; and the new "YouTube Elections Hub":http://www.youtube.com/politics that includes video content from eight editorial partners and will live-stream the upcoming political conventions and debates. We were joined by HuffPost's Roy Sekoff, YouTube's Olivia Ma and GigaOm columnist Liz Shannon Miller.

Direct download: mediatwits53.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Welcome to the 52nd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week we have a special edition of the podcast dedicated to unplugging and taking breaks from media and technology. We are immersed in a world of technology, with smartphones at our fingertips, texts and status updates waiting for us at all times, and work that's increasingly difficult to leave behind. As part of this week's "Unplug 2012 special report":http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2012/06/special-series-unplug-2012156.html, this podcast includes an in-depth discussion on ways to unplug and detox.

Our special guests are William Powers, author of the book "Hamlet's Blackberry"; Tanya Schevitz, communications manager for Reboot; and Levi Felix, who runs the Digital Detox retreat. They have various strategies for achieving balance with hectic work schedules and taking breaks and enjoying life. Tanya also helps run the "National Day of Unplugging":http://www.sabbathmanifesto.org/unplug in March.

Direct download: mediatwits52.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:04pm EDT

Welcome to the 51st episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. This week we take a deeper look at the changes at various local newspapers in North America, lowering their print frequency from daily down to a few times per week. Is this an alarming trend or a natural evolution of newspapers as they move toward a digital-first future? We convene an esteemed panel to discuss the future of print papers, including new USA Today president and publisher Larry Kramer and NYU journalism professor and PressThink blogger Jay Rosen. Would Kramer consider lowering USA Today's print frequency? "I wouldn't take anything off the table," he said.

We also talked with one of the more prominent programmer-journalists, Brian Boyer, who is leaving the Chicago Tribune news apps team to go to NPR to lead their new news app team. What made him make the move to radio, and how will his job differ? We talk to Boyer about his plans to bring more data know-how to public radio.

Direct download: mediatwits51.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:28pm EDT

Welcome to the 50th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali as co-hosts. The joy of the Facebook IPO was quickly replaced with disdain as the stock nosedived and lawsuits ensued. We run down the headlines, including the New Orleans Times-Picayune and Oregon Daily Emerald killing daily print editions for thrice- and twice-weekly editions, respectively. Special guests Craig Newmark of Craigslist and Kelly McBride of Poynter talk about their upcoming symposium where they will draw up new principles for ethics in journalism for the digital age. Will the so-called "Fifth Estate" take notice?

Plus, we talk to author and speaker Scott Steinberg about his new book, "The Crowdfunding Bible," all about how artists, singers, videogame makers, writers and startups have funded projects directly from fans online. Steinberg says that crowdfunding isn't for everyone, but those that succeed usually make headlines because they are the ultimate Cinderella stories.

Direct download: mediatwits50.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:36pm EDT

Welcome to the 49th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil as co-hosts. Today is the day for the Facebook IPO, so we've got it covered like a wet blanket. Special guests Debra Aho Williamson of eMarketer and Troy Young of SAY Media talk over the ins and outs of Facebook as it soars into the ionosphere. What are its possible weaknesses? Why is its ad revenue outlook falling short? Plus, it's Internet Week in the Big Apple, and Dorian and Troy are there. What are ad folks talking about, outside of the Facebook IPO?

Plus, it's web awards season time, and that means five-word acceptance speeches at the 16th annual Webby Awards, being streaming online on Monday. Special guest David-Michel Davies tells us why the awards will be even better this year, with geeky humorist Patton Oswalt hosting. But guest Josh Seifert thinks that digital awards can do better, and gives his own criticism of the Webbys and other advertising awards.

Direct download: mediatwits49.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:19pm EDT

Welcome to the 48th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. On this show, we turn to the chaotic soap opera that continues at Yahoo, once an Internet darling on its umpteenth remake. Its new CEO Scott Thompson appears to have padded his bio with a computer science degree that he never received. An activist investor found the "mistake" and our special guest Kara Swisher of AllThingsD has been on this story all week with updates. She talks about possible successors for Thompson and also gives the skinny on the upcoming 10th edition of the D conference.

Next up is the ever lovable debate on pay walls and paid content online. When we approached Gawker honcho Nick Denton about the subject, he said, "Pay wall discussions make me want to blow my brains out." Be that as it may, we ended up having a lively debate between Steven Brill, creator of CourtTV and American Lawyer magazine and current co-CEO of Press+, and Mike Masnick, who runs the TechDirt blog and community. Brill says that Press+ could be running metered pay walls for up to 1,000 publications by the end of the year, while Masnick says that keeping content free and sharable is the best way to stay relevant online.

Direct download: mediatwits48.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00pm EDT

Welcome to the 47th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. On this show, Rafat had the honor (and early-morning wakeup call) to interview news icon Dan Rather at 7 am while Rather was traveling by train to Washington, DC. Rather has a new memoir out, "Rather Outspoken," and talked to Rafat about why he's positive about journalism, the lack of online business model for news and the rise of Al Jazeera. With the Facebook IPO coming in a couple weeks, we had special guest Eric Jackson talk about his new Forbes story, with the catchy title: "Here's Why Google and Facebook Might Completely Disappear in the Next 5 Years." Jackson believes that a school of thought called organizational sociology might be relevant to the tech business today.

Finally, we looked deeper at a new social curation tool called Snip.it, similar to Pinterest but where people "snip" stories they like and put them into categories. Special guest Ramy Adeeb, founder and CEO of Snip.it, explained how he started the service after his frustration with sharing the best stories covering the Arab Spring a year ago. Now the service is growing, and helping to drive traffic to publishers' sites. But does it have staying power?

Direct download: mediatwits47.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:40pm EDT

Welcome to the 46th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. Rafat is celebrating his birthday, we're not sure how old he is, but we know that he loves photography. So this week we are celebrating his birthday by doing a special show focused on photography in the digital age. Our roundtable includes crack professional photographer Gregor Halenda, photo and multimedia guru Brian Storm and social photographer extraordinaire Thomas Hawk in a wide-ranging discussion.

First is the debate over rights: Is it a good idea to post your photos on social media under a Creative Commons license? Or should you be more restrictive of your photos online? We also talk about the state of stock photography and the democratization of photography now that the tools are more accessible -- and everyone has a potential global reach online. And what about the rise of amazing cameraphones, apps and filters? Now that Instagram has been bought by Facebook for $1 billion, what's the implication about the future of photo-sharing and filters? Thomas Hawk also cites Google+ as being a hotbed of photography. How did it surpass Facebook?

Direct download: mediatwits46.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:43pm EDT

Welcome to the 45th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rafat Ali as co-hosts. That's right, Rafat Ali is back in the saddle after a nearly three month trek to India, Burma and Iceland. And he's back just in time to talk cord-cutting once again, this time after new research showed that cable lost 1 million subscribers last year. Special guest Seth Shapiro, an analyst and educator, tells us that the reality is that 1 million is a drop in the bucket for cable companies that have more than 100 million subscribers. Shapiro details why Netflix, Hulu, Google and Apple have a very long road ahead in trying to compete with cable and satellite services.

And now for something completely different. Google is offering up Customer Surveys that will allow people to answer a question or two in a simple survey instead of paying for content behind a pay wall. The marketer pays 10 cents to 50 cents per survey answered and the publisher gets 5 cents each, with Google pocketing the difference. Special guest David Cohn helped pioneer this survey model at Spot.us with its Community Focused Sponsorships. He explains what they learned about surveys at Spot.us and how Google might be doing an even better job with this idea, which could prove to be a worthy alternative business model for online publishers.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits45.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:38pm EDT

Welcome to the 44th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week, we convene a special roundtable to discuss how social media is changing activism, in the wake of the Trayvon Martin shooting, in a backlash to Rush Limbaugh, and in many other cases. Our special guests include BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti, Ohio State civil rights history professor Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Change.org's Brianna Cayo-Cotter. How do activist campaigns go viral, and can they go too far?

Then we talk about the recent legal drama around social network Pinterest, where some copyright holders have been upset with use of their images. The social network recently changed its Terms of Service so it no longer had the right to sell the images of people who posted on the site. Plus, it now allows self-promotion. Special guest Steve Eder of the Wall Street Journal talks about the various copyright debates Pinterest has spawned in the legal community.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits44.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:11pm EDT

Welcome to the 43rd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. She is back from SXSW and slowly recovering from the interactive, music and film festival. The big news this week is Pew's annual State of the News Media report, which painstakingly explains how people are consuming news (more and more on mobile) and where the digital ad revenues are going (mainly to tech companies and not traditional media companies). Special guest Amy Mitchell was one of the Pew researchers who worked on the report, and she explains that Twitter and Facebook were growing but still only referred 9% of traffic to news sites.

We also looked in-depth at Yahoo's recent patent lawsuit against Facebook, timed perfectly before Facebook's upcoming IPO. Special guest Edward Weisz is a longtime patent attorney, and Brad Plumer is a business reporter at the Washington Post. They explain how patent law works, the reasons for inventors taking out patents, and the difficulty that startups have in going up against established companies like Yahoo that have a 1,000+ patent hoard. Even former Yahoo developers are upset that Yahoo has decided to sue Facebook, and recently Facebook decided to buy 750 patents from IBM to help defend itself. Should patent law be reformed for software?

Direct download: mediatwits43.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:43pm EDT

Welcome to the 42nd episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the Rachel Sklar as co-hosts. Sklar is a writer and social entrepreneur, and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week is a special episode dedicated to all things South by Southwest (SXSW), the media confab covering technology, music and film down in Austin, Texas. We have a great lineup of guests, who all attended SXSW, including Reuters' Felix Salmon, Collaboration Central's Amanda Hirsch, Salon's Irin Carmon and The Verge's Laura June. Carmon wrote a piece about the increase in participation by women and people of color at the show, but how much further it still has to go to reach better diversity of voices.

Has SXSW peaked? Jumped the shark? One stunt that got a lot of attention was the "Homeless Hotspots," homeless people who carried hotspots with them and asked for donations in order to give people Internet access. Laura June wrote that this was the "best, worst, smartest, dumbest part of SXSW." Plus, there was a lot of hype around "ambient apps" such as Highlight and Sonar which tell you which of your friends are near you. And the big rumor of the show was that CNN might buy social media blog Mashable for $200 million, a story broken by Felix Salmon. It hasn't happened... yet.

Direct download: mediatwits42.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:26pm EDT

Welcome to the 41st episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the George Kelly as co-hosts. Kelly is online coordinator at the Contra Costa Times newspaper and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week we have an action-packed show with a lot to cover. First up is "The New iPad," announced by Apple on Wednesday with a higher resolution screen, 4G wireless and a better camera and software. Ho-hum or yowza? Special guests Leander Kahney from Cult of Mac and Tim Carmody from Wired talk about the iPad's logical new name, why it is leaps ahead of everything else -- but they still can't convince George to get one.

Next is a study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism, which surveyed newspaper executives to find out how they were transitioning to more of a digital business model. So far, it's been a tough slog, reports the PEJ's Mark Jurkowitz, who comes on the show to break down the report's findings. And last but not least is Nicholas Thompson, who was recently named the new editor at NewYorker.com. Thompson was co-founder of the Atavist and says there's been a renaissance in long-form content online, something that the New Yorker will fully take advantage of.

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits41.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:09pm EDT

Welcome to the 40th episode of the Mediatwits podcast, this time with Mark Glaser and the George Kelly as co-hosts. Kelly is online coordinator at the Contra Costa Times newspaper and is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week the big topic is pay walls, as both the Los Angeles Times and Gannett newspaper chains are planning to charge for access to their websites. Special guest Jimmy Orr is managing editor, online, for the L.A. Times, and joins us to talk about the new "membership program" the paper is rolling out on Monday. We also have special guest Ken Doctor, a newspaper analyst and author, who puts the pay walls into context with other pay plans that have already been in place. Can a regional paper like the L.A. Times succeed the same way that a more national paper like the N.Y. Times has done so far?

Also, there's been turmoil at AOL's TechCrunch tech blog, with editor Erick Schonfeld leaving and Eric Eldon becoming the new top dog. With so many defections from the site, and traffic off somewhere between 35% and 50% since Michael Arrington's departure, can Eldon bring back the magic? Or will the new publications such as Uncrunched and PandoDaily get more juice as TechCrunch stumbles?

Direct download: mediatwits40.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:33pm EDT

Welcome to the 39th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Brightcove's Eric Elia, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. This week we convene a special roundtable to talk about one of our favorite subjects: cutting the cord to cable TV! We had hoped that a Comcast executive would join us, but he had to cancel at the last minute. Fortunately, we still had a stellar lineup of guests: Wall Street Journal's Ben Schechter, NewTeeVee's Ryan Lawler and Free Press' Jenn Ettinger.

The big news of the week was that cable giant Comcast announced its own streaming service called Xfinity Streampix, which is only offered to cable subscribers. They either pay $4.99 per month for the add-on service or it's free for people in the higher tiers of service. Will it keep people from cutting the cord and dumping Comcast? Also, Google has been laying fiber optic lines in Kansas City for a test run of a possible pay TV service. What does the search giant have up its sleeve?

Direct download: mediatwits39.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:49pm EDT

Welcome to the 38th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. First, we get a special on-the-ground report from special guest Mohamed El Dahshan in Tunisia, talking about a ruling expected from the country's Supreme Court about filtering the Internet. Mohamed also talks about how freedom of speech online briefly flourished in Tunisia and Egypt before being reined in. We also talked about the case of Hamza Kashgari, who could get executed in Saudi Arabia because of three tweets he wrote directed to the prophet Mohammed.

Next up was a discussion about Pinterest, the visual social networking site that has become a hit among people who like to do scrapbooks and bookmarking online. Special guest Courtney Lowery Cowgill, who wrote a popular story about Pinterest, tries to explain what makes the site so addictive -- and whether they can figure out a business model for it. Finally, we discuss recent moves by Apple responding to investigative reports about appalling conditions at its factories in China. The tech giant hired a labor monitoring group to do inspections at its Chinese factories, but will Apple take action or is this just whitewashing the problem?

Direct download: mediatwits38.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:17pm EDT

Welcome to the 37th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Jillian York, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. It's been a crazy week in media + tech, with important mergers abounding! First up is the Center for Investigative Reporting announcing that it will try to merge with another non-profit, the Bay Citizen, making a powerhouse investigative team to cover local, state and national issues. We get all the key players in that deal as guests on the show: CIR chairman Phil Bronstein, CIR executive director Robert Rosenthal and Bay Citizen interim CEO Brian Kelley.

Next up, there's a merger of key tech sites, both started by Indian-born bloggers who turned them into startup businesses. GigaOm announced it was buying PaidContent from the Guardian for an undisclosed sum. The Guardian will get stock in GigaOm's parent company and get a seat on the board. Special guests Om Malik, founder of GigaOm and Staci Kramer, SVP at ContentNext (and sometimes co-host of Mediatwits), talked about the deal and how the "synergy" in this case didn't mean layoffs. And finally, we discussed the recent move by Twitter to censor some tweets in countries that had more stringent free speech controls. Was Twitter right to implement these rules?

Direct download: mediatwits37.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:04pm EDT

Welcome to the 36th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil, who is filling in for Rafat Ali. It's been a crazy week in media + tech, with Google privacy concerns, Amazon falling short in earnings, and much more. But the dominant news was Facebook filing for an IPO, with demand to read its S-1 crashing the SEC's servers. The startup had $3.7 billion in revenues, with $1 billion in profits last year, and showed tremendous growth in users and advertising. Can anything slow down the juggernaut on the way to raising $5 billion in a public offering? We talked to special guest Nick O'Neill, founder of AllFacebook.com, who was impressed with the user engagement on the social networking site.

This week was also the "Dive into Media" conference put on by AllThingsD in Laguna Niguel, Calif. Special guest Peter Kafka programmed the show and interviewed many of the top execs on stage. He told us about the challenge of interviewing Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, a former improv comedian, as well as the mix of old and new media at the show. Finally, Columbia University's Journalism School and Stanford University's Engineering School received a $30 million gift from Helen Gurley Brown to create a new Institute for Media Innovation, marking the largest gift in the history of Columbia's J-School. Has digital media now arrived? Has the revolution been institutionalized?

Direct download: mediatwits36.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:50pm EDT

Welcome to the 35th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil, filling in for Rafat Ali. Once again, Apple dominates the headlines, this time for quarterly earnings that blew away Wall Street -- and everyone else. The company made $13.1 billion in profits in the quarter, more than Google made in revenues that same quarter. Apple was driven by the popular iPhone 4S as well as the iPad, and seemed it could do no wrong. But at the same time, the tech juggernaut found itself the subject of a series in the New York Times about horrendous working conditions at the factories that make iProducts.

Our special guest this week was Dan Zarrella, the "social media scientist," who gave us tips on how to get more clicks per tweet we send out. Zarrella is known for doing more than just spouting off-the-cuff advice for social media marketing, but actually putting numbers behind his tips. And finally, we looked at the East Coast vs. West Coast battle playing out in media + tech, as New York adds more of these jobs as the financial business shrinks there. Plus, Cornell got a massive donation to help build a new science and tech school on Roosevelt Island that will include a venture fund to incubate more tech companies in the Big Apple.

Direct download: mediatwits35.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:12pm EDT

Welcome to the 34th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week the show is mainly focused on the huge day of protest online Wednesday against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA) before the U.S. Congress. After Wikipedia, Reddit and other sites went black, and millions signed petitions and called lawmakers, at least 40 representatives and Senators said they wouldn't support the bills in their current form. It was a breathtaking display of online organization that got results.

Special guest Danny Sullivan of Search Engine Watch discussed the role that Google played in educating people and helping them take action. Plus, Sullivan created one of the more creative memes by sending a telegram to Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) because she didn't have an active Twitter or Facebook page. In other news, Chief Yahoo and company co-founder Jerry Yang announced he was stepping down as Yahoo tries again to turn the tanker around. Special guest Eric Jackson, an activist investor in Yahoo, talks about the brightened prospects for the web giant now that Yang has departed.

Direct download: mediatwits34.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:48pm EDT

Welcome to the 33rd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we have a special show focused on the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) happening in Las Vegas all week. Apple isn't there and Microsoft did its last keynote presentation there. Is the show losing momentum? Are we all burned out on gadgets and flatter TVs? We talk to two tech journalists on the CES floor, Rob Pegoraro and TechDirt's Mike Masnick, about the various new TV sets, tablets and smartphones. Plus, Masnick gives us an update about how the CEA and many folks at the show are overwhelmingly opposed to the two anti-piracy bills, SOPA and PIPA, before Congress.

Meanwhile, search giant Google caused a stir by integrating Google+ much more deeply into its search results. The new "Search Plus Your World" has been criticized as unfairly giving Google+ an advantage over Twitter and Facebook in search results. Google responded by saying that it was upset that Twitter didn't renew its contract to be included in search results. Will this move bring more trouble to Google, with the Feds already investigating the company over privacy issues?

Direct download: mediatwits33.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:45pm EDT

Welcome to the 32nd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. We're back from our holiday break and ready to tackle more media news! The big news of the new year is a new CEO (again) at Yahoo, this time PayPal president Scott Thompson will try his hand at turning around the Net pioneer. But most pundits say the odds are long on Thompson being successful because he has little discernable experience running a media or advertising company.

Our special guest this week is Edelman PR exec/pundit Steve Rubel, who is working on a new e-book via Tumblr called "The Clip Book," where he will give visual takes on the future of media in scrapbook-style. And finally, we turn to one new prominent Twitter user, @rupertmurdoch, and what appeared to be a new verified account for his wife, @wendi_deng, that ended up being a fake. What does that mean for the credibility of the Twitter platform and its lack of transparency in verifying accounts?

Direct download: mediatwits32.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:52pm EDT

Welcome to the 31st episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we turn across the pond to the U.K., where the BBC is pushing its BBC World cable news channel to an American audience. The BBC recently made a deal with Comcast to increase its reach to 15 million U.S. homes by the end of next year. We talked to BBC World honcho Peter Horrocks about the Beeb's moves, its digital experiments and whether cord-cutting was happening in the U.K.

Then we turned to the other big item of the week: Tech blog ReadWriteWeb was bought for a reported $5 million from Say Media (itself a roll-up of VideoEgg and Six Apart). The site was founded in 2003, and had lost some key editors recently. The buyout included an announcement that Dan Frommer of Business Insider would become a new editor-at-large for ReadWriteWeb. Finally, we look at two recent popular poll results at MediaShift, looking at cord-cutting (our favorite subject) and gadget gifts for the holidays.

Direct download: mediatwits31.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:40pm EDT

Welcome to the 30th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we have an eclectic mix of topics. First up is the UBS Media and Technology Conference in New York, where the talk of the conference was the rise of over-the-top video services and talks by Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes. Special guest Jeff Roberts from PaidContent was at the show and talks about what he heard (and the mainly optimistic mood there). Plus, Roberts comments on the ongoing investigations into price-fixing in the e-books market between Apple and big book publishers.

Then we turn to our seasonal conundrum: What gadget gifts are right for our loved ones? Special guest Brian Lam from the Wirecutter did a great shopping guide for gadgets and non-gadgets so we get his take on the right gifts for everyone. Lam believes that gadgets can be a tough gift to give because it's hard to find the perfect model for each person. He prefers surprising gifts that come with rich back stories.

Direct download: mediatwits30.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:48pm EDT

Welcome to the 29th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali. This week we get back from the Thanksgiving holiday and find some interesting mergers happening. First, there's the crowdfunding site Spot.us being acquired by American Public Media (APM) and its Public Insight Network. Guests David Cohn, founder of Spot.us, and Joaquin Alvarado of APM talk about the acquisition and what it means for Spot.us and the future of public media.

Then came news that billionaire Warren Buffett had bought his hometown newspaper, the Omaha World-Herald, for $150 million, as well as some Nebraska papers for $50 million more. Has he gone crazy, or is he crazy like a fox? And finally an HBO exec says they won't be offering up a digital-only package of content directly to people who have cut the cord to cable. But how will that play to the increasing number of folks who don't even have TV sets, and get their entertainment via streaming services or websites?

Direct download: mediatwits29.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:56pm EDT

Welcome to the 28th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil, filling in for Rafat Ali. This week is a special edition of the podcast dedicated to teaching journalism in the digital age. How can educators keep up with the changes happening in journalism and keep students ahead of the curve?

Special guests for the show are Sree Sreenivasan from Columbia Journalism School and Sarah Hill from the University of Missouri Journalism School and KOMU-TV. Both have been pushing for more social media skills for students, as well as making sure that they still get the essentials for traditional newsgathering. The wide-ranging discussion touched on the popularity of journalism schools, the need for students to have many more skills, and the rise of technology at J-schools.

Direct download: mediatwits28.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:40pm EDT

Welcome to the 27th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. This week we look deeper at the Groupon IPO, which briefly valued the daily deals startup at nearly $20 billion. Our special guests are Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget, as well as Yipit Data analyst Unaiz Kabani, both of whom have done a lot of thinking (and writing) about Groupon lately. In fact, Business Insider's Nicholas Carlson penned a 9,000 word epic insider story on Groupon that was turned into "an e-book":http://www.amazon.com/INSIDE-GROUPON-Controversial-Company-ebook/dp/B00634MNDY/ref=sr_1_10?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1320406625&sr=1-10.

Plus, we look at the recent announcement of a Nook Tablet from Barnes & Noble, an android tablet that will take on the Kindle Fire head-to-head, and provide more competition for the leading tablet, the Apple iPad. The Nook Tablet costs a bit more than Fire but is more open, letting people use more services outside the Amazon ecosystem. Will it be enough to drive sales in the Christmas shopping season, or will the Fire and iPad continue to dominate?

Direct download: mediatwits27.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:47pm EDT

Another episode of the Mediatwits, this time looking at a possible Apple TV set and the announcement of YouTube Channels.

Direct download: mediatwits26.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:37pm EDT

Welcome to the 25th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. This week is the "Beyond the Book series":http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2011/10/special-series-beyond-the-book297.html at MediaShift, and keeping with that theme the podcast is all about Amazon.com. Rafat admits to being a fanboy of Amazon, with 5 Kindles bought and 1 on order. Special guests Laura Hazard Owen from PaidContent and author James Altucher talk about the growing power and convenience of Amazon in the book business.

On the plus side, Amazon delivers convenience, cheap prices and one-click online shopping. It also has lowered the prices for e-books and has a dead-simple Kindle e-reader, with the $199 Kindle Fire tablet on the way. But Amazon has also taken PR hits for its avoidance of sales taxes in many states, and the poor working conditions at a fulfillment center in Pennsylvania. On balance, is the book-selling behemoth doing a public service or harm?

Direct download: mediatwits25.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:17pm EDT

Welcome to the 24th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. The hot topic is non-profit news sites and whether they can sustain themselves. A recent study was released from the Knight Foundation about the business health of some of these sites, and noted that they still need to experiment to find the right business model to survive. Special guests Mayur Patel from Knight and consultant Michele McLellan talked about their findings and bright spots at sites such as Texas Tribune and the St. Louis Beacon.

Also up for discussion was the amazing success of the iPhone 4S, with Apple selling 4 million of the phones in the first weekend on sale. With all that success, why did Wall Street knock Apple for last quarter's earnings miss? Plus, Google strikes back in mobile with "Ice Cream Sandwich," a new operating system that is sleeker, allows multi-tasking, and works the same on phones as tablets. Bonus futuristic feature: It can use face-recognition to unlock the phone.

Direct download: mediatwits24.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:27pm EDT

Welcome to the 23rd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. The main topic on this show is the rise of the Occupy Wall Street movement, how the media has covered it, and the remarkable "Occupied Wall Street Journal" newspaper. Special guest Arun Gupta is the co-founder of the newspaper and explains the importance of a print publication in political circles. Plus, the head of audio at SoundCloud, Manolo Espinosa, explains how Occupy protesters and journalists have been using the service to capture audio at the protests.

Meanwhile, Netflix backed down on its plan to spin off a separate DVD rental service, Qwikster, so what does that mean in the streaming video wars? And a Pennsylvania newspaper decides to keep its pay wall up even during a flood when residents were clamoring for emergency information. Was the publisher really serving the public by not bringing down the wall at least temporarily?

Direct download: mediatwits23.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:16pm EDT

Welcome to the 22nd episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. This week is a special edition dedicated to Steve Jobs, the technology visionary who died on Wednesday. The news spread quickly online and on social media, with so many heartfelt memories, stories and old videos. And of course, in death as in life, Jobs remained a polarizing figure, with so many admirers and so many haters. No one can deny he helped usher in the personal computing revolution, while later disrupting the music and telecom businesses and creating a whole new market for tablets.

The special guests this week are two Steve Jobs biographers: Alan Deutschman, who wrote "The Second Coming of Steve Jobs" in 2001; and Leander Kahney, who wrote "Inside Steve's Brain" in 2008. They're both eagerly anticipating the new biography of Jobs by Walter Isaacson. The discussion also touched on the recent iPhone 4S announcement from Apple, and the tough shoes Tim Cook has to fill as Apple's CEO. Plus, how does the new Kindle Fire stack up to the iPad? Amazon fanboy Rafat Ali already has his on order.

Direct download: mediatwits22.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:32pm EDT

Welcome to the 21st episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and entrepreneur Rafat Ali. This week is a special edition the war between the social networks, and what that means for the media world. Mark Zuckerberg took the stage at f8 to announce big changes to Facebook, including a new Timeline to showcase media from your entire life, as well as open graph apps that let you view media within Facebook. But he spent very little time talking about privacy issues. Do we all want to share our whole life on Facebook, "baby photos and all":http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2011/08/overexposed-baby-photos-in-the-age-of-facebook220.html?

Special guests Dan Reimold, a MediaShift contributor and assistant journalism professor at the University of Tampa, and SiliconFilter's Frederic Lardinois talked about the changes at Facebook, as well as whether Google+ has staying power. Google's social network just opened up to the general public, but will it remain "dead" as Reimold contended in "a controversial opinion piece on MediaShift":http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2011/09/google-social-media-upstart-worse-than-a-ghost-town262.html, or can it thrive as a hub for techies and media people? And where does that leave Twitter?

Direct download: mediatwits21.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:52am EDT

The latest episode of the Mediatwits is a newspaper special.

Direct download: mediatwits20.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:50pm EDT

Welcome to the 19th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, who is back from vacation in India. The news came fast and furious this week, with two Internet pioneers facing deep trouble. At Yahoo, CEO Carol Bartz was fired by telephone and told the media that Yahoo's board were "doofuses" who had "f---ed me over." At AOL, CEO Tim Armstrong has had to step in and fire TechCrunch editor Michael Arrington, who started a VC fund that brought up terrible conflicts of interest, and then demanded he get his editorial independence or get to buy back TechCrunch. 

Special guest Kara Swisher, co-executive editor of "AllThingsD":http://www.allthingsd.com, has been covering both stories in excruciating detail, calling the Crunchfund a "pig pile" and listing various nominees to run Yahoo. She Skypes in to join the conversation from a Starbucks, where she is furiously updating both big stories. Plus, Google got into the book publishing business by buying Zagat, whose restaurant reviews could help populate the search giant's Places pages, and help it take on Yelp.

Direct download: mediatwits19.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:26pm EDT

Welcome to the 18th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Staci Kramer, editor of PaidContent, who's filling in for Rafat Ali. This show looks at the recent purchase of iPad aggregator app Zite by CNN for a reported $20 million to $25 million. Why is CNN getting into iPad aggregation? Special guest KC Estenson, senior vice president and general manager of CNN.com, explains the importance of personalized aggregators and how they boost engagement. Estenson also talks about lessons learned from the CNN's online coverage of Hurricane Irene.

Next up is the U.S. Justice Department suing to block the AT&T/T-Mobile merger and the repercussions of that move. While Mark thinks the deal would have put a damper on competition, Staci does think it's such a cut-and-dried case. Also, the moves in streaming video have been fast and furious as September begins: Netflix's new pricing went into effect right as Starz announced it was ending its deal with Netflix. And while Hulu is still on the sales block it launched a new service in Japan, including a pricey paid service with no ads.

Direct download: mediatwits18.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:53pm EDT

Welcome to the 17th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Staci Kramer, editor of PaidContent, who's filling in for Rafat Ali. This show looks at the week's big changes in the media landscape. First, Steve Jobs announced he was stepping down as CEO of Apple, moving into a new position of chairman, while Tim Cook would become CEO. Next, Jim Romenesko said he was going into semi-retirement and would be leaving the column that has his name on Poynter.

Third, Slate announced layoffs, including Tim Noah and Press Box columnist Jack Shafer, a longtime media critic. Shafer was a guest on this episode of the Mediatwits, talking about the situation at Slate and calling Romenesko a "great American." But where there is change and the ending of eras, there's always a beginning, too, so second guest Owen Thomas talked about his new venture, The Daily Dot, where he is executive editor. As a bonus, the discussion even went back to Shafer's early profile of Suck.com back when Shafer worked at the SF Weekly (yes, he really did).

Check it out!

Direct download: mediatwits17.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:12pm EDT

Welcome to the 16th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. This show looks at the week's big news, including the head-turning buyout of Motorola Mobility by Google for $12.5 billion. What was driving the search giant to become a hardware maker? Was it the patents, the handsets, the set-top boxes? Special guest Tim Carmody of Wired has been on the story all week and gives his excellent perspective.

Plus, the show looks at one of the biggest, most explosive in-depth investigative reports in quite awhile -- by Yahoo Sports, of all places. Joe Lago, managing editor of Yahoo Sports, explains why the company is committed to doing long-form investigative reports, including its recent 11-month report on a rogue booster at the University of Miami. Lago says that Yahoo might begin doing more investigative reports outside of sports after the success of this expose.

Direct download: mediatwits16.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:17pm EDT

Welcome to the 15th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. This show is all about cord-cutters, people who like to watch TV without paying for cable or satellite TV (like Mark & Rafat). The big news is that Fox will not allow free streaming of its shows online for 8 days after airing unless you pay for Hulu Plus or can authenticate that you are paying for TV. Special guest "Brian Stelter":http://twitter.com/#!/brianstelter of the New York Times talks about the move by Fox and how ABC might make a similar move soon. Brian also talks about the streaming race between Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and others, as Netflix raises its rates and Hulu goes on the sale block.

Plus, the show covers recent moves by various app-makers who are stripping out the ability to buy books or subscribe to magazines within apps to keep from having to pay 30% to Apple. Apps for Kindle, Barnes & Noble and Kobo all have stripped out "buy" buttons and are directing people to buy outside the Apple ecosystem. Will others follow suit? Will a rush continue to develop web apps and HTML5 apps that get around Apple's big bite out of revenues?

Direct download: mediatwits15.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:33pm EDT

Welcome to the 14th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. There's a lot of news to cover in this podcast, including Apple's earnings, Yahoo's earnings, the possible sale of Hulu, and more. But the big deal this week is of course another heaping helping of "This Week in Rupert," with a side of humble pie. Our U.K. correspondent Tristan Stewart-Robertson weighs in on the reactions across the pond to the Murdochs testifying at a Parliamentary hearing. Are we all reaching a saturation point with the scandal yet? Possibly. (Vote in the MediaShift poll about that, below.)

Plus, the New York Times reported its quarterly earnings, with some mixed news on the digital front: About.com was still hurting but digital revenues at its News Group were up 15.5%, and iPad app ad inventory is sold out until the end of the third quarter. Digital subscriptions hit 1 million, with 281,000 paid. What does it all mean? Rafat talks about the "novelty" of reading the print edition of the Times, while Mark continues to read it on all platforms without paying.

Direct download: mediatwits14.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:45pm EDT

Welcome to the 13th episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. This week's show looks at a recent survey by Pew Internet that found that 35% of Americans now have smartphones, and that ownership is even higher among people of color. Guest Aaron Smith from Pew explained one surprise from the survey: 25% of smartphone users were using their phone as their main source of accessing the Net.

Then talk once again turned to the United Kingdom, and what is becoming a regular feature on the podcast: "This Week in Rupert." The phone-hacking scandal continues to widen, with News Corp. dropping its bid to take over BSkyB, and a new FBI investigation into possible phone hacking of 9/11 victims in the U.S. Special guest Jack Shafer, Pressbox columnist for Slate, says not to jump to conclusions and that the New York Post and Fox News are innocent until proven guilty.

Direct download: mediatwits13.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:22pm EDT

Welcome to the twelfth episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. This week's show looks at the recent launch of Facebook video chat with Skype built in. While Facebook called its announcement "awesome" it was underwhelming for tech and media insiders who have been wowed by the Google+ Hangout feature that lets you do video chats with up to 10 people. Rafat and Mark tested out both video chats *simultaneously* -- all in the name of science. Guest Marshall Kirkpatrick from ReadWriteWeb, who broke the story about Google+ back in March, gives his take on the competing video chats.

The talk then turns to across the pond, where the biggest press scandal in memory has grown even larger, as News International decided to close its tabloid the News of the World, after more allegations of phone-hacking came to light (not to mention police bribes and government indifference). Special guest Tristan Stewart-Robertson, a MediaShift correspondent in the U.K. who has freelanced for News of the World, gives his take on the role of social media in putting pressure on the tabloid and its advertisers.

Direct download: mediatwits12.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:59pm EDT

Welcome to the eleventh episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Rafat Ali, the founder of PaidContent. This week's show looks at the recent launch of Google+, a more fully formed social network that is taking on Facebook. Google+ is in an invite-only mode but both Mark and Rafat had a chance to try it out. Special guest Danny Sullivan of Search Engine Watch joins the show to spell out just how difficult Google+ will have it trying to overtake entrenched social networking king Facebook.

Plus, MySpace, the former social networking leader, has fallen on hard times, with News Corp. recently selling it in a fire sale for just $35 million, a far cry from its sale price in 2005 for $580 million. What went wrong? Could the same thing happen to Facebook? And how can Google+ be the next Facebook and not the next MySpace?

Direct download: mediatwits11.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:41pm EDT

Welcome to the tenth episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser and Dorian Benkoil, filling in for Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the changes in Apple's subscription plan for publishers, as they backpedal on the pricing. But still, Apple will take a 30% cut of subscription revenues and keep the data on subscribers, which has caused publishers like the Financial Times to develop "web apps" on HTML5 that live outside the App Store.

This week's special guest is Matthew Hindman, assistant professor of media and public affairs at George Washington University, who recently did a study on online local news. Hindman found that only a tiny amount of web traffic (1/2 of 1%) was going to local news, but we wondered about sites that were too small to count in comScore data. Finally, we talked about how the New York Times' pay wall and Wired's iPad app prices had come down considerably. What's behind those moves?

Direct download: mediatwits10.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:01pm EDT

Welcome to the ninth episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the recent purchase of Tweetdeck by Twitter, and the questions it raises about companies starting businesses on the platform of other companies. If you run an app for Twitter but aren't bought by Twitter, where does that leave you?

This week's special guest is Jen Lee Reeves, who teaches at the Missouri School of Journalism and is the interactive director for KOMU-TV. She has been covering the recent tornados and bad weather in Missouri and using her TV station's Facebook page to connect with its community. Finally, the talk turns to conflicts of interest for entrepreneurial journalists and tech bloggers such as Michael Arrington, Kara Swisher and Om Malik. Should they be able to invest in companies they cover, be venture capitalists themselves? How do they maintain credibility?

Direct download: mediatwits9.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:44pm EDT

Welcome to the eighth episode of "The Mediatwits," the weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the big IPO of business networking site LinkedIn, with the stock price doubling to more than $90 per share in its first day of trading, valuing the company at nearly $10 billion. Things are getting a little bubbly out there.

This week's special guest is Bill Grueskin, the dean of academic affairs at Columbia University's Journalism School. Grueskin talks about the upcoming launch of the school's new online publication, the New York World, as well as how Columbia is putting greater emphasis on students learning about the business of journalism. Finally, Amazon had an important milestone recently, saying it is now selling more e-books than print books. How has the Kindle survived the onslaught of the iPad and tablets?

Direct download: mediatwits8.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:53pm EDT

Welcome to the seventh episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at Microsoft's massive payout, $8.5 billion, for Skype, a popular communication service that still loses money.

Our guest this week is Laura Rich, the co-founder of the new "Street Fight":http://www.streetfightmag.com site covering the business of hyper-local and geo-location. She responds to our earlier criticism of the site on a past episode. Plus, Google announces its new "Chromebook": netbook computers that don't have any software beyond a web browser, and will be out next month.

Direct download: mediatwits7.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:18pm EDT

Welcome to the sixth episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the way the news of Osama Bin Laden's death played out over Twitter and other new media, making minor celebrities of "@ReallyVirtual":http://www.twitter.com/ReallyVirtual and "@KeithUrbahn":http://www.twitter.com/keithurbahn.

Our guests this week were two vice presidents at Demand Media, Larry Fitzgibbon and Jeremy Reed, who talked about a new direction for the network of sites -- moving away from user-generated content and adding longer features. Plus, Apple relented on some of its strict terms of service for magazine publishers who want to publish iPad editions, letting Hearst and Conde Nast get access to the data on subscribers.

Direct download: mediatwits6.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:18pm EDT

Welcome to the fifth episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show is about the various social media policies at news organizations, and how they vary from place to place. Plus, can media companies actually <em>own</em> the followers of popular reporters or on-air anchors?

Our guest this week is John Tayman, CEO and co-founder of Byliner, a new place for long-form journalism and storytelling. Plus, we follow up on last week's episode about iPhones and iPads tracking people, and look at the MediaShift poll results.

Direct download: mediatwits5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:36pm EDT

Welcome to the fourth episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show is obsessed with all things Apple -- and iPhone. Apple had a blow-out earnings quarter, nearly doubling its profits and selling more iPhones than ever with the new Verizon iPhone. But the creepy part is the finding by scientists that your iPhone (and iPad) knows your location and has been storing that in a secret file since last June.

Our guest this week is Neal Augenstein, the first major-market radio reporter to give up his bulky equipment and use just an iPhone to do audio and video reports for WTOP-FM and wtop.com in Washington, DC. Plus, there are two new news aggregators and apps, Trove and News.me, that needed a quick take.

Direct download: mediatwits4.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:11pm EDT

Welcome to the third episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the recent $105 million lawsuit brought against Huffington Post for not paying its bloggers, as well as our grades for AOL's various business moves, including the hyper-local Patch sites and buying TechCrunch. Our guest this week is Ken Lowery, one of the co-editors and co-authors of the @FakeAPStylebook on Twitter and the new book "Write More Good." Plus, we give first impressions on the new "Street Fight" online magazine about the hyper-local news business.

Direct download: mediatwits3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:37pm EDT

Welcome to the second episode of "The Mediatwits," the new revamped longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali. This week's show looks at the repercussions of the $39 billion buyout of T-Mobile USA by AT&T. Rafat has had both services and will stick by AT&T, but Mark is making the move from AT&T to Verizon. Plus, the authors of the book, "Tweets from Tahrir":http://www.orbooks.com/our-books/tweets-from-tahrir/, were special guests on the show, explaining how they got their book to print so fast. Finally, MediaShift poll results showed that nearly 90% of respondents would not pay for NYTimes.com content at the current high prices.

Direct download: mediatwits2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:45pm EDT

Welcome to the first episode of "The Mediatwits," the revamped, longer form weekly audio podcast from MediaShift. The co-hosts are MediaShift's Mark Glaser along with PaidContent founder Rafat Ali, who is working on a stealth startup. This week's first beta show was mainly about the new metered pay wall coming to NYTimes.com and its mobile apps. Special guest Steve Outing joined the show to talk about the pay wall as well, expanding on his take on his own blog. Plus, the discussion covered Rafat's recent trip to visit Al Jazeera in Qatar, and everyone's take on cutting the cord to cable TV with recent moves by Facebook and Netflix.

Direct download: mediatwits1revamp.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:53pm EDT

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